First Wednesdays – CSS Shenandoah takes sail

October 1864 was the month that the CSS Shenandoah took sail on her infamous cruise N_98_1_48 James Iredell Waddellaround the world. It is, with that in mind, that the State Archives of North Carolina is happy to announce that the CSS Shenandoah Log Books have just been uploaded to the Civil War 150 Digital Collection. The log books are part of the Military Collection, and due to their delicate nature, are kept in the Archives vault, so having them now available to the public is exciting. Along with the log books, the letter of surrender that Captain James Iredell Waddell wrote to Lord John Russell is now included in the digital collection as well.

If you read over the log books of the CSS Shenandoah the story that unfolds looks somewhat like this…

October 1864, Captain Waddell rendezvoused with the Sea King, a British merchant ship that the Confederacy had secretly purchased. Waddell took command, and the ship was quickly refitted as a warship and rechristened, as the Confederate States Steamer, Shenandoah. The mission of the Shenandoah was to cruise the seas and destroy Union shipping fleets. The destruction of this type of commerce was an effort to directly affect the economy of the New England states of the Union. With a small crew of only 19 crewmen and 23 officers, the Shenandoah took sail, heading first to the Indian Ocean. A ship the size of the Shenandoah usually would require 150 men to sail, Waddell and his officers hoped to be able to recruit seamen from their prizes while on their cruise.

The Alina of Searsport, Maine, was the first ship captured by the Shenandoah. She was on the way to Buenos Aires with a load of railway iron and other supplies. The supplies were brought aboard, and they were able to recruit seven more crewmen. After that the Charter Oak from Boston was taken, an old Boston bark carrying beef and pork, The Susan from New York, Lizzie M. Stacey, of Boston, a New Bedford whaler, from which they took on many fine prizes and the Delphine, who had no cargo but from whom they received six new crew members.

In January, the Shenandoah and her crew came to port in Melbourne, Australia to make repairs and pick up provisions. While in port, Waddell had 14 men desert, but he also gained 45 “stowaways.”

Leaving Australian waters in the early spring of 1865, Waddell took the Shenandoah North toward the Okhotsk Sea. On the way, he entered the harbor of Ponape (now spelled Pohnpei) and took 4 more prizes; the Edward Carey of San Francisco, California, the Hector, of New Bedford, Connecticut, the Pearl of New London, Connecticut, and the Harvest of Oahu, Hawaii. From these prizes, Waddell was able to obtain whaling charts, which gave him a great advantage on the rest of his journey.
It was mid-April 1865, Confederate generals Joseph E. Johnston and Robert E. Lee had surrendered their armies and the war was over, however Captain Waddell and the rest of the crew of the CSS Shenandoah did not know that. They were heading north toward the Okhotsk Sea.

After six weeks they crossed into the Okhotsk Sea, the weather was getting cold and ice was starting to form. On May 27, 1865, they came across the Abigail, from her they obtained a large amount of alcohol, a new acting master’s mate, Thomas S. Manning, and 14 crew members changed their allegiance and joined the crew of the Shenandoah.

On June 6, 1865, the Shenandoah turned toward the Bering Sea. On June 22, 1865, the Shenandoah captured the William Thompson and the Euphrates. The captain of the William Thomas informed Waddell that the war was over. Waddell did not believe him and torched the ship anyway. While in the Bering Sea, the CSS Shenandoah captured and either burned or bonded another 21 ships. Some of those captains also spoke of the end of the war, but without proof, Waddell and his crew resumed their raids.

It was August 1865, when the British bark, Barracouta arrived with newspapers proving the war was over.

“Having received by the Br. Barq “Baracouta” the sad intelligence of the overthrow of the Confederate Government, all attempts to destroy shipping or property of the United States will cease from this date, in accordance with the first lieutenant William C. Whittle, Jr; received the order from the commander to strike below the battery and disarm the ship and crew.”

The efforts of the CSS Shenandoah were very successful, in the short time they were at sea; they captured 38 ships, 32 of which they destroyed, with a total worth estimated at $ 1,772,223. The issue was that of those 38 ships, 25 of them were taken after the war was over.

Waddell and his officers knew that they would be regarded as pirates if they returned to the United States and so now they had the dilemma of what to do. What they did now was set sail for Cape Horn; from there they turned north toward Britain.

On November 5, 1865, the CSS Shenandoah steamed up the Mersey River off Liverpool. The last words entered in the Log Book of the CSS Shenandoah November 6, 1865, were, “arrived in the Mersey off Liverpool and on Monday the 6th surrendered the Shenandoah with British Nation by letter to Lord John Russell premier of Great Britain-“

CSS Shenandoah Log Book number one

CSS Shenandoah Log Book number two

Letter from Captain Waddell to Lord John Russell

Image of James Iredell Waddell

Posted in First Wednesdays, News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

“The case is before you now for such aid as you render.”

By September 1864, events continued to spiral downward for the Confederate States of America. Since the summer of 1864, federal armies had roamed at will in and out of its borders. Major General William Tecumseh Sherman and his combined Union armies had recently captured Atlanta, Georgia, and were now attempting to corner the Confederate Army of Tennessee in north central Georgia. Major General Philip Sheridan advancing “up” the Shenandoah Valley chasing the remnants from Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s forces after its defeat at Fisher’s Hill, Virginia. Confederate General Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia remained locked in place by Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant’s combined Federal armies around Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia. In addition to this growing chain of military defeats, the Confederacy was now running short of personnel and provisions to continue the fight to achieve lasting independence. Without these desperately needed provisions, the Confederate armed forces would not be able to secure their nation’s continuation through the victories on the battlefield.

As had happened with the French in the 1790s, the Confederacy had hoped that groundswell of men of all ages would reverse the fortunes of war. Unfortunately, a levee en masse or mass mobilization did not occur as Confederate leaders had planned; as a result, the Confederacy was forced to turn to conscription for the white male population and impressment for its free and enslaved African-American male population. Confederate military officers saw the African-American male population as a ready source of forced labor for freeing white males to fight on the battlefield. In both 1863 and 1864, the Confederate Congress had passed legislation to impress the male slave population as labors to assist the Confederacy war effort. Impressment did not come without a cost. White slave owners resisted efforts to take their property away from them and not be properly compensated for their use and potential loss. Once away from their owners, African-Americans saw the opportunity to flee toward Union lines or resist the Confederacy through poor work and or by claiming illness. As with conscription of white males, the Confederate government’s efforts to impress slaves created another political storm as slave owners resisted the Confederate military. The Confederate Congress attempted to deal with that controversy by ordering state and local officials to impress free persons of color first before contacting slave owners.

Governor Zebulon Baird Vance discovered during this gubernatorial campaign of 1864 that his effort to impress slaves to work on fortifications on the North Carolina coast was becoming a political liability. His political supporters were slave owners, and they began to weigh their continued support for him against his efforts for impressment. As with conscription, Vance had to walk a fine line to continue his support for the Confederacy, while also maintaining his political support within the state. In addition, Confederate Major General William Henry Chase Whiting, the commander of the Military District of Wilmington, N.C., verbally sparred with Governor Vance in order to force him to commit more troops and slave laborers to strengthen Confederate fortifications at the mouth of the Cape Fear River. General Whiting saw his efforts to defend this territory as the most important military efforts occurring in North Carolina in the summer of 1864. His calls for assistance became so strident, than Governor Vance had to turn to the Confederate War Department to mediate between himself and General Whiting.

The letter dated September 24, 1864, is an example of the General Whiting’s calls of assistance to Governor Vance. General Whiting noted that of the 800 impressed laborers that had already been sent, “…many of these have deserted & many are down in sickness.” He was convinced that there were “10,000 men” available to come into the Confederate army to assist in the defense of Wilmington and the mouth of the Cape Fear River. For good measure, Whiting used a letter from General Lee that stated that “…the force of negroes must be increased…” and that the reserve forces of the state must provide assistance to his forces in and around Wilmington, N.C.

Posted in News | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Exclusive Civil War Bus Tour – Early Registration Closes Soon

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Cultural Resources press release - you can find other news related to NC Cultural Resources here.]

From the massive amphibious attack on Fort Fisher to the 6,000 acre battlefield at Bentonville to the site of the largest surrender of the Civil War at Bennett Place, there’s so much Civil War history to see in North Carolina.

This October, you can explore five of North Carolina’s major Civil War sites on our exclusive weekend Civil War Sesquicentennial Bus Tour.

Participants will get an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at North Carolina’s best Civil War sites, including on-bus lectures by pre-eminent Civil War historian Mark Bradley. Here are some of the highlights:

  • A curator-led, Civil War-focused tour of the C. Museum of History
  • Dinner in the Rotunda of the State Capitol after a Civil War tour of the antebellum site
  • A Fort Fisher “above-the-scenes” tour that provides a bird’s-eye view of the massive fortification and the battles fought there
  • A circa 1865 period meal on the grounds of Bentonville Battlefield, followed by a nighttime Civil War medicine living history program

And much more ‘insider’s’ knowledge will be shared and experienced.

The cost for the Oct. 24-26 tour is $375 per person based on double occupancy and $455 per person for single occupancy by Sept. 15.

The cost after Sept. 15 is $395 per person double occupancy and $475 per person single occupancy. Two meals and two hotel stays are included.

Seats are going fast, so register now at ncdcr.gov/CivilWarTour!

For more information, please call Vivian McDuffie at (919) 807-7394 or visit www.ncdcr.gov/CivilWarTour.

About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council, and the State Archives. Cultural Resources champions North Carolina’s creative industry, which employs nearly 300,000 North Carolinians and contributes more than $41 billion to the state’s economy. Learn more at www.ncdcr.gov.

 

Posted in Events, News | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Traveling Archivist Offers Help to North Carolina Repositories

[This blog post comes from Andrea Gabriel, Outreach and Development Coordinator for the State Archives of North Carolina, and is cross-posted from the History For All the People blog.]

Could you use some help with managing and caring for your archival collections?

Applications are now being sought for admission to the Traveling Archivist Program (TAP), a program providing onsite consultation in best practices for the preservation of and access to archival materials held in North Carolina repositories.

TAP addresses best practices in accessions and acquisitions, preservation and conservation including environmental conditions, proper handling and storage, public access tools and outreach, and administrative infrastructure. Each site visit includes a collections assessment, discussions with staff and administrative personnel, and practical low-cost recommendations to improve preservation and access. These recommendations will be formalized in a written report provided to your organization. Some basic supplies will be supplied.

The TAP program is open to all North Carolina cultural and heritage institutions that house and maintain active archive and record collections accessible to the public. Applications will be accepted until September 26, 2014. The application and instructions are available from the News and Events page on the State Archives website.

Learn more about this program via Traveling Archivist Offers Help to North Carolina Repositories on the State Archives main blog.

Questions relating to the application or the program may be addressed to Andrea Gabriel, State Archives of North Carolina, 919.807.7326; andrea.gabriel@ncdcr.gov.

 

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

First Wednesdays – “We are all nearly worn out with waiting for the tide”

By early 1863, Governor Zebulon Vance saw the need for the State of North Carolina to operate its own system of supplying Tar Heel soldiers in the field. His limited service as the colonel of the Twenty-Sixth North Carolina Troops gave him firsthand knowledge of the inadequate nature of the Confederate supply system, and as Governor, he felt that he had the right take care of his citizens serving in combat. He created a state office known as the “Bureau of Foreign Supplies,” and contracted with a British mercantile firm to purchase ships to transport North Carolina cotton overseas. The firm, Alexander Collie Company, would receive half of the profit from the sale of the cotton, and North Carolina would receive the other half. With that share of the profit, North Carolina purchased much needed war supplies for the return trip back to Wilmington, N.C.

The system worked extremely well, until it became entangled with Confederate officials in Richmond, Virginia, who demanded that North Carolina give up its share of purchased war supplies to the Confederate War Department. For the better part of 1863 and 1864, Governor Vance maintained a war of words with Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Confederate Secretary of War James Seddon over North Carolina’s use of its own blockade runner, S.S. A.D. Vance, and other ships such as the S.S. Don, S.S. Nebula, S.S. Rover’s Bride and other ships contracted by North Carolina and Alexander Collie Company. Much of this controversy continued until the port of Wilmington, N.C. was closed in early 1865.

Photo # NH 53958 Confederate blockade runner Advance in 1863 - Courtesy of Naval History and Heritage Command

Photo # NH 53958 Confederate blockade runner Advance in 1863 – Courtesy of Naval History and Heritage Command

For our “First Wednesdays Post,” we are highlighting the S.S. A.D. Vance during its attempt to run the blockade in September 1864. The ship had attempted to go over the New Inlet bar numerous times, and was forced to into port at Smithville, N.C. to await the rising of the tide. The letters dated 1 September 1864 to Alexander Miller McPheeters and Governor Zebulon Vance were written by John White before the S.S. A.D. Vance’s fourth attempt to cross over the New Inlet Bar. John White was Governor Vance’s agent to Great Britain and a native of Scotland. S.S. A.D. Vance was unsuccessful in its crossing over the bar that night, and it was not until the night of 10 September 1864 was the ship able to cross the bar and begin its’ run to Bermuda. Due to the C.S.S. Tallahassee, a Confederate privateer, seizing a load of anthracite coal that was meant for blockade runners, the S.S. A.D. Vance was forced to use inferior coal for its’ run through the blockade, and was soon spotted by the U.S.S. Santiago de Cuba. The U.S. Navy vessel was able to give chase and captured the flagship of North Carolina’s blockade runner fleet.

Photo # NH 61919 U.S.S. Santiago de Cuba. Photographed during the Civil War - Courtesy of Naval History and Heritage Command

Photo # NH 61919 U.S.S. Santiago de Cuba. Photographed during the Civil War – Courtesy of Naval History and Heritage Command

Fortunately, the State Archives of North Carolina has a wealth of sources pertaining to Governor Vance’s efforts to supply North Carolina troops through the N.C. Bureau of Foreign Supplies. These records range from our Civil War Collection within our Military Collection; Adjutant General and Governor’s Office, Military Board Records for the period of the 1863-1865; private manuscript collections (particularly Calvin J. Cowles, John Devereux, John Julius Guthrie Papers, and D. H. Hill Papers); Governor Vance’s own gubernatorial papers for 1863-1865; and lastly, our Treasurer’s and Comptroller’s Papers, subseries titled “Military Papers,” boxes 93-97.

Please see below for our “Second Mondays” presentation titled The Blockade and Blockade Running in North Carolina, 1861-1865 by Andrew Duppstadt, Curator of Education, N.C. Division of State Historic Sites.

 

Posted in First Wednesdays, Second Mondays Lectures | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“…you promise forgiveness to all who will repent…”

By late August and early September 1864, the Confederate field armies were slowly losing their ability to counter the Union offensives in both eastern and western theaters. The push to quickly end the war in 1862/1863 bled the Confederacy down to the bone, making it more difficult to rebound from a defeat by replenishing both manpower and supplies. Confederate regiments and battalions simply did not have enough men even to cover the frontage needed for a line of battle in normal formation for infantry brigades and divisions. To counter this growing deficiency, the Confederate Congress passed a series of three conscription acts to pull men into the armies to maintain the level of efficiency seen in the victorious Confederate armies of 1862/1863. Unfortunately, these acts exposed flaws in Confederate political support in states like North Carolina, where support for secession had only marginal approval by the electorate. By 1863, many states like North Carolina had pockets of rebellion of white male population simply refusing to enlist or be conscripted for military service, and in many cases, physically resisting any attempt to force them to serve.

By 1864, many supporters of the Confederacy saw North Carolina as the main culprit in inability to generate enough manpower to rejuvenate staggering Confederate losses on the battlefield. They pointed to the rise of the peace movement in the state and the growing political support of William Woods Holden. In addition, clandestine Unionist organizations, such as the Heroes of America, were forming chapters in many Tar Heel piedmont and mountain counties. North Carolina Governor Zebulon Baird Vance saw that North Carolina was losing the public relations battle with other Confederate states and the Confederate government itself, and attempted to show that North Carolina was a willing and enthusiastic supporter of Southern Independence. He used his brilliant oratory skills to proclaim his support for the Confederacy during his gubernatorial campaign, and to note the sacrifices of North Carolinians on the battlefield to other Confederate national and state officials.

Confederate General Robert E. Lee issued General Orders, No. 54 on 10 August 1864 in an effort to entice military deserters back to the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. This general order was an offer of amnesty to those wayward soldiers to return back to General Lee’s army. In the past, executions and other forms of punishment were used to keep soldiers in the ranks, but those techniques did not always work with soldiers facing the prospect of death on the battlefield for a perceived losing cause. To bring former soldiers back into the ranks of his rapidly diminishing army, General Lee attempted to appeal to deserters’ senses of honor and desire to support their comrades in arms. Fourteen days later on 24 August 1864, Governor Vance issued his own proclamation to bring those disaffected North Carolina soldiers back into the ranks. As with General Lee, Vance attempted to appeal to soldiers’ sense of honor, but also asked for his fellow citizens and local officials to aid in this drive to bring soldiers back. Vance’s proclamation was also a veiled threat: “…I hope by timely submission they will spare me the pain of hunting down guilty felons many brave and misguided men who have served their country well and could do so again.”

In Wilmington, N.C., Private Thomas Hansley, Company H, Fortieth North Carolina Troops (3rd N.C. Artillery), was in military prison for attempting to desert from the Confederate forces in and around the Port City. He tried to board a blockade runner heading for Nassau, but was discovered and imprisoned by Confederate authorities. In his letter dated 3 September 1864, he wrote Governor Vance asking for clemency from his charge of desertion based on the recent proclamation of amnesty. He cited personal issues with his company commander, which he claimed forced him to attempt to desert the Confederate army. He wrote “All I ask is one chance more to show that I can be a good soldier…” Hansley’s appeal was successful, and he was released from military prison by December 1864. He rejoined his regiment, and served in the upcoming military campaigns for control of Cape Fear River in early 1865. He was captured at Fort Anderson on 19 February 1865, and was sent to the U.S. Military Prison at Point Lookout, Maryland. He survived his captivity and was released on 13 May 1865.

Posted in News | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Treasures of the Archives: “Tar Heel fight”

[This blog post was written by Debbi Blake, Collection Services Section Manager for the State Archives of North Carolina.]

On August 28, 1864, Major Joseph A. Engelhard wrote a letter to “Friend Ruf” in which he described the successful Battle of Ream’s Station, Virginia as a “’Tar Heel fight.”  Engelhard went on to say that Confederate General Robert E. Lee gave thanks to God for these boys.

A graduate of UNC and Harvard Law School, Joseph A. Engelhard was born in 1832 in Mississippi.  He worked with judges in Chapel Hill and Raleigh, and later opened a law practice in Tarboro, North Carolina.  Leaving his practice in May 1861 to serve as assistant quartermaster of the Thirty-third North Carolina Troops under Colonel, then later Brigadier General, Lawrence O’Bryan Branch, Engelhard rose to the rank of major.  He was made assistant adjutant general and transferred to Brigadier General William Dorsey Pender’s brigade.  In May 1863, he became divisional adjutant when General Lee formed the Third Corps, and General Pender was placed in charge of one of the three divisions.  Once Pender fell at Gettysburg, Engelhard was tasked with writing the performance report of Pender’s division during that battle.

Engelhard’s use of the term “Tar Heel” fight comes at the top of the second page of the letter, when he explains that the “brilliant little fight” was made up of all North Carolina troops.  This use of the term “Tar Heel” was one of the first times it was seen written down, although the term seems to be at least common enough that “Friend Ruf” and others would know what was meant by it.  Although there is speculation that the term was used during the Revolutionary War, there is no evidence currently to support it being used before the American Civil War.

The letter, now in the custody of the State Archives of North Carolina, is part of the Treasures of the Archives and is currently housed in our security vault.  A diary that predates this letter by about a year also includes the term and the two additional items that form our “Tar Heel” collection.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

First Wednesdays – “I think it is not honorable war fare.”

During the fifty-second month of the American Civil War, both sides of the conflict were becoming exhausted through the constant combat experienced during summer of 1864. In the past years of the war, engagements were fought, and both armies were then settled back in camp to nurse their wounds. In this particular year, there was no respite for the combatants with active military campaigns being conducted throughout the Confederacy. On the Gulf of Mexico, a Union naval force under the command of Rear Admiral David Glasgow Farragut had pushed through a Confederate minefield to run past the outer defenses of Mobile Bay to defeat a Confederate naval force and to close off Mobile, Alabama. To the northeast, recently appointed Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood attempted to reverse the fortunes of the Confederate Army of Tennessee by striking the combined Union armies of Major General William Tecumseh Sherman to keep Atlanta, Georgia firmly in Confederate hands. Some 470 miles farther to the northeast, the Union armies of Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, under the leadership of General Robert E. Lee, remained fixed in a military stalemate in and around Richmond, Virginia.

In effort to break the stalemate on the front, members of the Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers requested permission from Union Major General Ambrose Burnsides to dig a mine shaft under the Confederate positions to blow a gap, where federal troops can be pushed through to exploit the Confederate defenses. By 23 July 1864, the shaft was completed and 8,000 pounds of gunpowder was packed under a Confederate redoubt named “Elliot’s Salient.” Elements of two infantry divisions from the US Ninth Army Corps were chosen to lead the charge through the planned gap after the explosion. Initially, the African-American Fourth Division was to lead the assault, but just prior to the attack, an exhausted white First Division was chosen instead make the first push through the path of the explosion. Ten days later, the mine was ignited, and the salient simply disappeared in a cloud of falling dirt, men, and equipment. The initial advance of the white troops hesitated, and by the time the Fourth Division advanced in the gap, the Confederate forces had rallied and turned the “Crater” into a killing zone for the Union soldiers.

In his letter dated 7 August 1864, First Sergeant James M. Brooks, Company B, Twenty-Sixth North Carolina Troops (NCT) wrote to Chatham County Sheriff R. B. Paschall of the aftermath of the fighting at the “Crater.” Fortunately, the Twenty-Sixth NCT was not involved in the initial fighting, but was moved quickly over the James River as part of the Confederate efforts to reinforce the sector of the salient. In addition, Sergeant Brooks wrote regarding the current gubernatorial election in North Carolina between Governor Zebulon Vance and William Woods Holden, and the canvassing of votes of the North Carolina regiments in the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. Despite this initial burst of combat at “Elliott’s Salient,” both sides would soon settle back into the military stalemate on Virginia front.

Posted in First Wednesdays, News | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Modern Greece

On 19 April 1861, President Abraham Lincoln announced a blockade of the Southern states that were in rebellion, namely Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas. Eight days later, he added the states of North Carolina and Virginia to this extraordinary blockade of a sovereign nation cutting off its own ports to put down an internal rebellion. To counter this measure, the Confederacy and private individuals began to use commerce vessels to transport war material and commercial products to the blockaded Southern states. These vessels came to be known as “blockade runners.” These ships soon became extremely specialized in design to take advantage of the shallow drafts of the Southern coastline, and employed camouflage and smokeless coal to disguise themselves from the growing federal blockading fleets. In addition, these ships would use latest naval engineering to generate speed to outrun the U.S. Navy ships stationed outside of Confederate ports.

N.73.12.30 - Courtesy of the  State Archives of North Carolina

N.73.12.30 – Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina

One of the most iconic images of the “blockade runners” is one that was identified as the Modern Greece, which was run ashore near Confederate Fort Fisher on 27 June 1862 after being chased by the U.S.S. Cambridge near Wilmington, N.C. The Modern Greece was one of the largest blockade runners at that time, and at the time of its grounding, contained roughly a ton of gunpowder, four Whitworth breech loading cannon, Enfield rifled muskets, and a large amount of commercial goods for Wilmington, NC. Roughly one hundred years later, the wreck of the Modern Greece was exposed by a storm, which allowed the excavation of artifacts from the wreckage site. The above painting has adored many book covers and a copy of the painting has also been viewed at the Blockade Runner Museum, which was formerly in operation in Carolina Beach, N.C. in the 1960’s and 1970’s.

Recently, some doubt has been raised on whether the ship pictured above is actually the Modern Greece. The ship does resemble the Modern Greece in its size and it’s depiction as a screw propeller steamer. The ship is shown grounded on the beach like the Modern Greece with U.S. Naval Blockaders moving in to finish her off. One of the blockading vessels is shown to be a Canonicus-class monitor similar to the U.S.S. Tecumseh, which was sunk during the Battle of Mobile Bay, Alabama on 5 August 1864. Unfortunately, none of the monitors of that class were present with the North Atlantic Blockading Fleet in the summer of 1862.

The State Archives of North Carolina was recently asked to determine the origin of the original painting through a patron wishing to use the image for her publication. Through contact with fellow scholars in the Wilmington, N.C. area, it was confirmed that a copy of the painting was displayed in the Blockade Runner Museum in Carolina Beach, N.C. Through additional research, the painting was identified as “The Blockade Runner Ashore” by David Johnston Kennedy dated 1864. The original painting now resides at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Presidential Library in Hyde Park, New York. According to historians at the Roosevelt Presidential Library, President Franklin D. Roosevelt purchased the painting at a bookshop in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1933. It is not known whether the artist David J. Kennedy had read accounts of the capture of the Modern Greece for his painting, but it is a possible venue for future scholars to explore.

Please join us for our next “Second Mondays” presentation at 12 noon on Monday, 11 August 2014, when Historian Andrew Duppstadt will speak on “Blockade Runners.”

For additional information, please see:

http://nccultureevents.com/event/41175-blockade-runners

Posted in Events, News, Second Mondays Lectures | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Exclusive North Carolina Civil War 150th Anniversary Bus Tour Oct. 24-26

[This blog post comes from a Dept. of Cultural Resources press release - you can find other news related to NC Cultural Resources here.]

From the massive amphibious attack on Fort Fisher to the 6,000 acre battlefield at Bentonville to the site of the largest surrender of the Civil War at Bennett Place, there’s so much Civil War history to see in North Carolina.

This October, you can explore five of North Carolina’s major Civil War sites on our exclusive weekend Civil War Sesquicentennial Bus Tour.

Participants will get an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at North Carolina’s best Civil War sites, including on-bus lectures by pre-eminent Civil War historian Mark Bradley. Here are some of the highlights:

  • A curator-led, Civil War-focused tour of the N.C. Museum of History
  • Dinner in the Rotunda of the State Capitol after a Civil War tour of the antebellum site
  • A Fort Fisher “above-the-scenes” tour that provides a bird’s-eye view of the massive fortification and the battles fought there
  • A circa 1865 period meal on the grounds of Bentonville Battlefield, followed by a nighttime Civil War medicine living history program

And much more ‘insider’s’ knowledge will be shared and experienced.

The cost for the Oct. 24-26 tour is $375 per person based on double occupancy and $455 per person for single occupancy by Sept. 15. The cost after Sept. 15 is $395 per person double occupancy and $475 per person single occupancy. Two meals and two hotel stays are included.

Seats are going fast, so register now at ncdcr.gov/CivilWarTour!

For more information, please call Vivian McDuffie at (919) 807-7394 or visit www.ncdcr.gov/CivilWarTour.

About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council, and the State Archives. Cultural Resources champions North Carolina’s creative industry, which employs nearly 300,000 North Carolinians and contributes more than $41 billion to the state’s economy.  Learn more at www.ncdcr.gov.

Posted in Events, News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment